St. Luke’s Mariner Medical Clinic adds 3D mammography in Superior

From left, Kevin Nokels, St. Luke’s President & CEO; Katy Johnson, St. Luke’s Mariner Medical Clinic project manager, and Amy Honz, St. Luke’s Mariner Medical Clinic Radiology Mammography Lab Technologist

St. Luke’s Mariner Medical Clinic held a ribbon cutting ceremony to celebrate being the first clinic in Superior to offer patients state-of-the-art 3D mammography technology.

The cutting-edge technology makes an important difference in early detection of breast cancer, St. Luke's said. A 3D mammogram is able to take 15 photos of each breast to provide a three-dimensional image, making abnormalities easier to identify earlier and treatment more successful. This also allows more-invasive breast cancers to be caught sooner. The increased number of pictures also means fewer callbacks for patients. 

“Having a breast cancer diagnosis is scary and anything we can do to help improve our patients’ outcomes with early detection is critical,” St. Luke’s President & CEO Kevin Nokels said. “A 3D mammogram makes it more likely that will happen, and we’re proud to be the first to deliver that standard of care to our patients in northern Wisconsin.”

Experts recommend that women with an average risk for breast cancer between the ages of 40 to 54 years old get a mammogram every year. A woman is considered to be at average risk if she doesn’t have a personal or strong family history of breast cancer or a genetic mutation such as the BRCA gene, and has not had chest radiation therapy before the age of 30. Women 55 and older have the option to switch to a mammogram every other year or to continue with yearly mammograms.